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Prosecco

Prosecco (/prəˈsɛk, pr-/,[1][2] Italian: [proˈsekko]) is an Italian white wine. Prosecco DOC can be spumante ("sparkling wine"), frizzante ("semi-sparkling wine"), or tranquillo ("still wine"), depending on the perlage.[3] It is made from Glera grapes, formerly known also as Prosecco, but other grape varieties may be included.[4] The following varieties are traditionally used with Glera up to a maximum of 15% of the total: Verdiso, Bianchetta Trevigiana, Perera, Glera lunga, Chardonnay, Pinot Bianco, Pinot Grigio and Pinot Nero.[5]

The name is derived from that of the Italian village of Prosecco (Slovene, Prosek) near Trieste, where the grape may have originated.[6]

Prosecco DOC is produced in nine provinces spanning the Veneto and Friuli Venezia Giulia regions.[7] Prosecco Superiore DOCG comes in two varieties: Prosecco Conegliano Valdobbiadene Superiore DOCG, which can only be made in the Treviso province of Veneto on the hills between the towns of Conegliano and Valdobbiadene(north of Treviso), and the smaller Asolo Prosecco Superiore DOCG, produced near the town of Asolo.[7]

Prosecco is the main ingredient of the Bellini cocktail and can be a less expensive substitute for Champagne.[8][9]

In Italy, Prosecco is a ubiquitously utilized wine.[6] Outside Italy, it is most often drunk as an apéritif, much as Champagne is. As with other sparkling wines, Prosecco is served chilled.[14]

Unlike Champagne, Prosecco does not ferment in the bottle, and it grows stale with time. It should be drunk as young as possible,[28] preferably within three years of its vintage, although high-quality Prosecco may be aged for up to seven years.[29]

Compared to other sparkling wines, Prosecco is low in alcohol, about 11 to 12 percent by volume.[14] The flavor of Prosecco has been described as intensely aromatic and crisp, bringing to mind yellow apple, pear, white peach, and apricot.[9][14] Unlike Champagne, appreciated for its rich taste and complex secondary aromas,[14] most Prosecco variants have intense primary aromas[14] and are meant to taste fresh, light and comparatively simple.[8] The view that Prosecco cannot be aged has been challenged by other experts, as a recent vertical tasting going back to 1983 demonstrates the longevity of the wines from one of their top producers.[30]

Most commonly Prosecco is served unmixed, but it also appears in several mixed drinks. It was the original main ingredient in the Bellini cocktail and in the Spritz cocktail, and it can also replace Champagne in other cocktails such as the Mimosa. With vodka and lemon sorbet, Prosecco is also an ingredient of the Italian mixed drink Sgroppino.

Credit Wikipedia https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Prosecco